Bring the pain and the results will follow.

At the first signs of pain, most people usually quit.  It could be the pain associated with exercising.  The pain of having to cook dinner instead of going out to eat to save money. Or, it could be the pain of finally tackling that project that you have been putting off.

Our ability to endure pain, physical or mental, could be the secret that leads to success or failure in accomplishing our goals.

Karel Gijsbers, a psychologist at the University of Stirling, in Scotland, published an influential paper in the British Journal of Medicine in 1981. Gijsbers along side one of his graduate students, put 30 elite swimmers from the Scotland National team through a series of pain tests and then compared those results to 30 Club Level swimmers and 26 non-athletes.

The protocol for this study involved cutting off the circulation to the subjects arms with a blood-pressure cuff, and then having them clench and unclench their fist once per second. The “Pain Threshold” was defined as the number of contractions needed to produce a sensation that registered as pain rather than merely discomfort. “Pain Tolerance” was quantified as the total number of contractions before the subject gave up.

The first finding was that the pain threshold was essentially the same in all three groups, starting around 50 contractions.  The second time the test was conducted the results were different. The pain tolerance of the National Team swimmers endured an average of 132 contractions before calling it quits.  Compared to the 89 in the club swimmers and 70 in the non-athletes.

Gijsbers remarked that because of the more systematic approach in which the National Team Swimmers exposed themselves to pain during training, that they had created or harnessed brain chemicals like endorphins, or perhaps simply thanks to psychological coping that allowed them to endure more pain.   He also said that “pain” can be strangely motivating or even required to the highly motivated athlete.

Gijsbers conducted these studies three more times throughout the year and found that the National Team Swimmers scored highest in June, which is their peak racing season; lowest in October, which is their off-season, and somewhere in the middle during their regular training period in March.

These seasonal fluctuations suggest that pain tolerance is linked to the type of training that the swimmers were doing during each of these testing periods. During the season, they were pushing their limits every single day, which provided them more tolerance based on their daily training schedules.

Similar studies have been done since Gijsbers studies in 1981, and they have all concluded with similar results.

So if pain is required to have more success, how do I train myself to be able to endure more pain?

For the purposes of this writing, I will stick to the topic of just exposing yourself to more pain.  To be able to endure more pain, you have to set a goal a reason for that goal.  I have covered those topics extensively in other writings.  Email me if you are interested in reading those bwillett555@gmail.com

In a recent book I read, it discussed the fact that when it comes to exercise that most of us will quit long before we ever run into any possibility of really hurting ourselves.  Our body is hardwired to shut down well before we could possibly ever get in to serious trouble of actually dying.  But if you have ever worked out before, really really hard, you may feel like you are about to die while you are in the moment.

At this peak of exhaustion and mental anguish is when most people quit. They don’t push themselves through the pain, because most of us are don’t want to feel this kind of pain.  However, when you are feeling this pain it is when you are actually burning the most calories and optimizing the benefits from the actual exercise you are doing.

I’m not suggesting you go forever, I’m just suggesting you may want to push yourself during this pain for a certain amount of time, and then each workout after you continue to push yourself to stay in that zone longer and longer.  This is where you will start to see more results and growth.

What about the pain associated with eating dinner at home versus going out to eat.  I have been there before, I was in debt and spending close to thirty to thirty-five percent of my monthly income on going out to eat.  If you are spending that much money on eating out and you add-on top of that twenty-five percent in housing costs, and then all of your other expenses, including the debts.  You can see real quickly that you won’t make much progress on eliminating your debts.

My suggestion is to first figure out how much you are spending and on which days do you typically do this.  I am sure you will see a pattern.  Then decide which days or day you will pick to stop doing this. It could be on Mondays or Saturdays.  It depends on your pattern. It could be on the days you attend class or your kid plays sports.

Now that you have the day picked out, decide what you will do instead. Will it be cooking at home that day.  Or should you pick another day to make additional food, so you can eat leftovers on the day you pick?   Seems like a lot of work doesn’t it?  It is so much easier to just eat out instead.

Yes it sure does. But this isn’t getting you any closer to your goals of paying off debt.  Your ability to endure the pain is what will either help or hurt you in achieving this goal.

I am quite sure that if you are reading this your goal is not to be an Olympic Swimmer.  However, I do think you are like most people and want to find a way to get ahead and move you and your family closer to your ideal situation financially as well as lifestyle wise.

To do this, it is going to require you to do things that you haven’t been able to do before successfully.  As my mentor told me, “To get what you have never had, you have to do something that you have never done.”  Maybe this is you as well.

Enduring pain and making sacrifices is not a forever thing.  It is only for a season, a period of time, it isn’t going to last forever.  If you endure some pain during a workout for three months or so, each day enduring more and more.  Eventually you will hit your goal.  If you don’t eat out for a period of time, you will eventually get to a better financial position than you are currently. Believe me, I have lived this personally.

So the question is are you willing to endure some pain to accomplish your goals?

To your success and your future.

If you need some help with this contact me at bwillett555@gmail.com I am currently meeting with clients to help them achieve the things they want in their life and in their career.

Excerpts for this blog taken from the book Endure; Mind, Body, and the Curiously Elastic Limits of Human Performance written by Alex Hutchinson. 

 

 

 

 

The two best measurements on determining what you think is important

Years ago when I was single I would eat out a lot, even more so than I do as a married man now, I think. Ha Ha.  I can remember one year I was looking at my bank account online.

My bank had one of those software systems that put all of my spending into categories, and it gave me a pie chart of how and where I spent my money. Under the food category it would actually break down by name the different restaurants where I spent my money.

I can remember looking at this chart and thinking to myself. WOW.  I spent a lot of money at this restaurant, and that restaurant, they should be giving me so free food. I did say that in my head, but what I really thought was, Oh my God, I can’t believe how much money I am spending just to eat out and then basically flush that money down the toilet, if you know what I mean.

At the point I made the decision to change my eating habits and only eat out a few times a month. At this time, I was in the process of making some investments and doing some other things that I needed to do to secure a better future for myself. I made those changes and about a year later, I was significantly better off.  That one little change in habit and discipline allowed me to make others changes as well.  These changes allowed me to have some success in several areas of my life.

This one little measurement in my life had high gains for me.  By looking at my spending habits I could easily tell what it was that I valued.  And that was work, because I didn’t have time to cook.  Or at least that is what I told myself. And I enjoyed not having to cook. And my thinking in my head at that time was “I had the money to spend”, so why shouldn’t I do it?

I tell everyone today that if I look at your bank account and your transactions I can learn really quickly what it is you value and think is important.   And these important things could be good for you or bad for you, I don’t know.  The bottom line is, you and I both, spend our money on things we think are important.

The other area of people’s life that I can look at and take a measurement of, and know what it is they find important.  Is where they spend their time, inevitably I have people tell me all of the time in my workshops that they put their family above everything else as the most important, and the time they spend with them is sacred.

Then I ask them to complete a timelog (which is a log that you put what you do each day down on paper to the quarter-hour of every hour).  Now, most people never want to be totally honest with themselves and put exactly how, and how much time, they spend on certain things.  But those who do, can really learn a lot from this exercise.

What people typically find out is that they waste more time than they thought they did.  They also learn that what they say is most important, doesn’t always measure out to be as important. At least the amount of time, if any, given to that activity.

Are you willing to do an inventory of yourself or your household? Are you willing to look at these two measurements in your life and see if you are spending too much, or too little time and money in these areas?  Most people aren’t willing to be this critical with themselves, but you are different if you have read this far.

Take a look at how you spend your money.  What trends do you see?  Good or bad.  If you are interested in tracking your time on a timelog, reach out to me at bwillett555@gmail.com and I will give you the timelog sheet for free. Just shoot me an email with the subject line TimeLog and in the email put your email address.

Before you can decide where you want to go, you have to first know where you are.  You can do this by measuring these two areas of your life.

To your success and your future.

 

 

 

 

 

I have had enough of “ENOUGH”

Doing just enough is so normal in today’s society. We get just enough service at the local restaurant that we decide not to ask for a manager.  Our results are just good enough that we don’t look for a different solution.  Our pay is just enough that we don’t look for another job.  We have just enough good days at work that we just think it is ok, since they outweigh the bad days. We are just healthy enough that we think we shouldn’t worry about health and exercise.  We have just enough money in the bank that we are not living paycheck to paycheck.  We get just enough praise and recognition that it will last us until the next time we get praise and recognition.  Some of us do just enough work at work that we think are existence is justified.  We think that when we put in enough time that “enough time” is more important than the results. We think if we have enough meetings about the issues that they will solve themselves.  If I talk about everyone else not doing enough, it justifies me not doing enough.  Any of this sound familiar?

I am not sure what enough is.  I don’t think it is possible to have enough. Enough is a mindset.  If Michael Phelps thought he was giving it enough in the 2008 olympics, he wouldn’t have won 8 Gold Medals.  In the 100 meter ButterFly, Phelps edged out Milorad Čavić by 100 hundredth of a second.  100th of a second!  How do you even measure that?

So are you tired of enough?  Be spectacular today and seek excellence, don’t settle for enough. That is my goal!

To your success and your future.

 

The Rear View Mirror

For those of you who drive a vehicle know exactly what I am talking about.  When you are driving you frequently may look in your rear view mirror.  It is not something you do all of the time.  But it is something that most good drivers do quite frequently.  If you are like me, it something you definitely do when you have to hit your brakes and especially when you have to hit your brakes hard.

Looking in our rear view mirror is necessary to understand what is going on around us.  It gives a gauge.  It is no different from life.  In our life we must look in our rear view mirror to see what is going on.

  • How did I get here today.
  • Why did I get here today.

Just like in your car, the rear view mirror is not something you look at very long.  Looking to the past for a quick moment is always good, but don’t dwell on it.  Look forward.  As we start another week in this eighth month of the 2014, I am looking forward.  I am looking so far forward in an attempt to design the life I want to live, the passions I want to pursue and be around others that are doing the same thing.

Enjoy your week and only look in the rear view mirror long enough to be aware of what is going on around you.

 

3 step process to resolve objections

In almost all sales classes I teach and every time I meet a new sales person, they always love to talk to me about additional training on how to resolve objections.  I guess it should technically be my one of my favorite subjects since so many people and companies buy sales training for this reason alone.

I like to keep things simple.  I am simple person and the more simple I can keep things the better off I am.

Here is a the process I teach.  The scenario: You just heard the objection, how do you respond:

1st:  Instead of instantly replying with your answer.  You respond to the individual letting them know that you heard them.  You would say something like:  “Bob, I understand pricing is a consideration for you in this purchase.”   This lets the buyer know you heard what they said and you acknowledge it being a concern.

2nd: Clarify:  “Bob, since the budget is a consideration, what are your parameters of your budget.”  This question allows you to seek clarity to what the budget concerns are. Maybe he has an exact budget number.  Maybe they have a fiscal year coming up, maybe it is the end of the month cycle. It could be all of these things.  So your job as the sales person is to seek clarity around this budget.

3rd:  Dive a little deeper:  So you have fleshed out the budget constraints.  You now need to seek out if there are any other things that could prevent the sale from moving forward.  So you would ask Bob.  “Bob, outside of the budget considerations, is there anything else that we should look at before moving forward?”  This is his opportunity to tell you if there are any other things he may be unsure of.

Once you take a prospect through these questions you should have an understanding of where they are.  In each of the above scenarios your job is to clarify and explain to them how your product will meet their needs they have.  But you first have to get all of the possible objections out on the table and that is what this process does.

The key in dealing with objections is first asking the right questions and understanding their needs before you ever get to the objections.  Are they really a buyer.  Think about it.  When you need something really bad, you go and buy it, right?  Have you ever purchased something you didn’t need?  Sure you have, we all have.  Why is that? Because after seeing it you wanted it.  Maybe the sales person was able to show you how you could benefit from buying the product.  Keep something in mind, we all love to buy things.

Remember all sales begin with relationships, and once you have a strong relationship established it creates the right environment for someone to want to buy your product.

Brian Willett

Trump 101; The Way To Success; Donald Trump

I wouldn’t call this a book summary, because it isn’t.  What it is, are my highlights from the book as I read it.  Maybe it is a book summary, or maybe it is what I like.  Who knows!  maybe you will find some value in it as well.

  • Somewhere between childhood and the real world two things happen. Either you start to pursue the dreams of your parents or you get caught up in pursuing dollars or stature in a career field.  People who do this have their passion on the shelf collecting dust and end up being part of the 70 percent who don’t like what they do.
  • Lack of passion is often the difference between failure and success.
  • Set the bar high:  What is the standard you want to be known for. Don’t shortchange yourself.
  • Find innovations, approaches, and practices that you can adapt for your chosen field.
  • Explore how to make everything you tackle bigger, bolder, better and more exciting.
  • Einstein said imagination is more important than knowledge. Without imagination and the ability to think big, knowledge alone won’t make you successful.
  • Most people are impatient and want quick results, but waiting is often the smart way to go.
  • Build a financial cushion that will allow you to avoid being squeezed when problems occur.
  • When you acquire knowledge, it makes you a more interesting and interested person.
  • Ket to success is experience not education. Experience comes from action, doing, taking risks.  Knowledge is essential but knowledge alone isn’t enough.
  • When you’re prepared there is no reason to be nervous.
  • The key to striking a deal os persuasion not power. Persuasion is diplomacy at its best.
  • He who has the gold makes the rules.
  • Few people are naturally gifted extemporaneous speakers, but most can learn.
  • It’s easy to take the conventional route and not make waves, but the easiest way can be the mediocre way, it may be a little more than just treading water.
  • When you begin feeling comfortable, it should be an alarm that alerts you that you may be falling in a trap.
  • Stress is usually focusing on the problems instead of the solutions.
  • Always build for tomorrow:  Think about your brand, your reputation, and your company.
  • Never think of learning as a burden or chore.  It may require discipline, but it can be a stimulating and exciting adventure.
  • Leadership is not a group effort.  If you’re in charge, then be in charge.
  • Don’t get secure in your comfort zone. When you get comfortable, you can become complacent and never grow.
  • Success is good.  Success with significance is even better.
  • If you can’t write your idea on the back of a calling card, then your idea is not clear.
  • Clarity and brevity arent incompatible.
  • Being satisfied can undermine you and keep you from reaching your full potential.
  • Don’t find fault, find a remedy.
  • When things go wrong, look at yourself first.
  • Experience build confidence.
  • Courage isn’t the absence of fear, It’s the conquering of fear.
  • Productive people accomplish more for a reason, they work long and hard.
  • Emerson said: Do not go where the path may lead; go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.  You won’t be successful by following someone else’s route.
  • Identify your intrinsic values, what you really want and will work hard to get.

My highlights and my notes and takeaways from TRUMP 101 (The way to success); author Donald Trump.

Which of the notes do you like and can apply today? Please share.

The Goal Setting plan that changed my life

This one little exercise allowed me to set goals that I would have never even considered, thanks to my mentor Jim Rohn. And guess what!!! I have accomplished a lot of the little ones already.

Here is your challenge today.  Write down 50-100 things that you want.  ALERT:  WHAT YOU WANT, not what you think you can get.

Example:

  • I want a lake house that is paid for.
  • I want a promotion to….
  • Pay off my car
  • Pay off my student loans
  • Be Vice President of Sales
  • Make $100,000 dollars a year
  • Have X amount of money in my childs college fund
  • Lose 20 pounds
  • Have 5 paid for rental properties
  • Complete my Masters degree
  • Go on a cruise

This is not an exhaustive list, but it is a good start.  Now take your list and put a 1, 3, 5, 10 next to it.  These numbers represent how long you think it will take to accomplish these goals.  Be realistic with your self, but also put a number next to it that will stretch you some.

EX:

  • I want a lake house that is paid for.  (10)
  • I want a promotion to…. (3)
  • Pay off my car (1)
  • Pay off my student loans (1)
  • Be Vice President of Sales (5)
  • Make $100,000 dollars a year (3)
  • Have X amount of money in my childs college fund (5)
  • Lose 20 pounds (1)
  • Have 5 paid for rental properties (5)
  • Complete my Masters degree (3)
  • Take a cruise (1)

Does this make sense to you?  Again I reiterate write down things you want, NOT what you think you can get.  The purpose of this is to expand your thinking, I WANT YOU TO THINK BIG here.  What will happen if you come up a little short?  NOT much.  You will accomplish something.  80% of something is better than 0% of nothing.

Also, use numbers that you think make sense to you.  I used the 1,3,5,10.  But maybe you want to use 6 months, 1 year, 3 year.  However, I challenge you think longterm. Many studies show that the ability to think longterm is a path to success.

Now that you have these goals established, what do you do?  If you are interested in the next step, email me and I will send you the next steps in the process.

 

 

1 year ago: What has changed? NOT MUCH

It was about a year ago this month that I made the decision to stop watching the NEWS.  Yes the NEWS.  Mainly the National News.  Yes, I was a FOX News junky.  I watched the O’Reilly Factor, Hannity, and Greta.  Not much Greta, because that is too late.  However, if my TV was on, you can guarantee it was on FOX News.  I watched it every night.  It was my routine.  To date, I haven’t even seen a O’Reilly episode in a year.  I don’t even know if he is still on, I would assume he is. I would also mix it up and watch some of the other National News channels as well, but not as much.  I could get political here, but I won’t.

I cut the NEWS off a year ago. and I cut my cable off about 5 months ago.  Yes I cut my cable off in the middle of Basketball season, what an idiot, right.  Not really. As I look back over the last year, since I stopped watching the NEWS, I can honestly say that the fact that I don’t have all of the NEWS and information of the day in my life, it really hasn’t impacted me at all.  The only impact that it has had in my life is for the good.  I have read more books, made more money, lost a lot of weight, became more physically fit, and in general accomplished a lot more things.

What has changed, NOT MUCH!  Now that I cut it out, I can say without a doubt that the NEWS and cable really provided me no value what so ever.  I hate to look back, but if I add up the amount of time I watched one program, lets see what that is.  7 years I watched O’Reilly.  That is 5 days a week for 7 years, for 1 hour.  That equals:  5 hours a week.  20 Hours a month. 260 hours a year. And 1,820 hours over 7 years.  As I am typing this, I want to get sick. Matter of fact I think I will end my post on this.

Looking forward, I will spend major time on major things and minor or no time, on minor things.  This is the best utilization of my most precious and valued commodity that I have, which is the resource of “time”.

Brian Willett

Don’t be an incompetent

My goal in my Sales Class courses is really two-fold:  First and foremost is to teach the class participants how professionals use a process to make sales.  Amateurs wing it and professionals have a process and they know why they win the sale, when they win the sale.  Meaning they follow a sound process.  The second goal in my class: to provide tools and resources that the class participants can apply to their life.  Real leadership is first leading yourself.  Meaning you do what you ask others to do.  Secondly, creating inspiration for others to see that they can become more and have more.

Throughout my class I start with the core of the curriculum and then weave in personal and self-development resources that the class participants can apply to their business, their profession, and their life.

All of my class participants start in 1 of the 4 competencies outlined below.  In their sales knowledge and skill as well as their personal development, they all start in 1 of the 4 areas.  By the end of the course my goal is to have them at least to the 3rd competency.

They can be: 

1.  Unconsciously / Incompetent:  They don’t know they don’t know.  We have all been here before.  They have never been trained on a sales process, they have never been coached for improved performance, so they don’t know that this stuff exists.

They then become…

2.  Consciously / Incompetent:  Meaning they know that they don’t know.  The people who fall into this category are a lot of fun, because if they are aware enough to know that they don’t know, they usually really want to be in my course.  This applies to life as well.  When you can admit that you don’t know something it is usually a great first step in the right direction.

Through the course they become…

3.  Consciously / Competent: Meaning they have now learned a process and they are applying it and are aware of what they are doing and have applied some of the skills learned. This is a really good place to be.  See most people are not aware of where they are and they don’t even know it.  So in my course when a person becomes consciously/competent about the sales process and where their buyer is in the buying decision, it allows them to know what to do next, and by being consciously aware of that you can have more success than you normally would have if you didn’t know what you were doing.

A great example of this is when I play golf.  I have to really focus on are my arms straight, is my head down, and my swinging through the ball.  As you will see below, the golf professionals are not in this category all of the time, they get to the next level of competency even though we all bounce back and forth between the last two competencies.

When you get here during this process on any new skill or trade it is good place to be, because you now have a foundation and you can build off of it, if you continue to focus on it.

Lastly…

4.  Unconsciously / Competent: At this stage you become so good at something that you just do it.  You don’t even have to think about.  It’s like driving a car.  When you get into your car, you just put the key in the ignition and go.  But watch a new driver.  What do they do?  They are a little slower usually aren’t they?  They check the mirrors, they adjust the seat, they are just a little slower than those of us who are more seasoned aren’t they. Another good example is this.  When Kobe Bryant is dribbling the ball down the lane going for a lay-up and the defender steps in his way.  He unconsciously knows he has to crossover the ball to his other hand so the defender doesn’t steal the ball.  He doesn’t even have to think about it, he just does it.  Its like the professional golfers.  They don’t have to think about the little things like I do when they are playing golf. They are unconsciously/competent on those things.  They are more worried about other things.

So where are you in your life, your skills, your career.  Do you not know what you don’t know?  Do you know you don’t know?  So what are you going to do about it?  Or are you aware and you’re applying the training you have received and maybe you need more.  Or are you just so good that you “just do it”.  Be aware of where you are, that is always the best first step and then create some goals to get where you want to be. If you don’t know where you are going you just might end up there.

Brian Willett

The Daily Miracle

“Philosophers have explained space. They have not explained time. It is the inexplicable raw material of everything. With it, all is possible; without it, nothing. The supply of time is truly a daily miracle, an affair genuinely astonishing when one examines it. You wake up in the morning, and lo! your purse is magically filled with twenty-four hours of the unmanufactured tissue of the universe of your life! It is yours. It is the most precious of possessions. A highly singular commodity, showered upon you in a manner as singular as the commodity itself!

For remark! No one can take it from you. It is unstealable. And no one receives either more or less than you receive.

Talk about an ideal democracy! In the realm of time there is no aristocracy of wealth, and no aristocracy of intellect. Genius is never rewarded by even an extra hour a day. And there is no punishment. Waste your infinitely precious commodity as much as you will, and the supply will never be withheld from you. No mysterious power will say:—”This man is a fool, if not a knave. He does not deserve time; he shall be cut off at the meter.” It is more certain than consols, and payment of income is not affected by Sundays. Moreover, you cannot draw on the future. Impossible to get into debt! You can only waste the passing moment. You cannot waste to-morrow; it is kept for you. You cannot waste the next hour; it is kept for you.

I said the affair was a miracle. Is it not?

You have to live on this twenty-four hours of daily time. Out of it you have to spin health, pleasure, money, content, respect, and the evolution of your immortal soul. Its right use, its most effective use, is a matter of the highest urgency and of the most thrilling actuality. All depends on that. Your happiness—the elusive prize that you are all clutching for, my friends!—depends on that. Strange that the newspapers, so enterprising and up-to-date as they are, are not full of “How to live on a given income of time,” instead of “How to live on a given income of money”! Money is far commoner than time. When one reflects, one perceives that money is just about the commonest thing there is. It encumbers the earth in gross heaps.

If one can’t contrive to live on a certain income of money, one earns a little more—or steals it, or advertises for it. One doesn’t necessarily muddle one’s life because one can’t quite manage on a thousand pounds a year; one braces the muscles and makes it guineas, and balances the budget. But if one cannot arrange that an income of twenty-four hours a day shall exactly cover all proper items of expenditure, one does muddle one’s life definitely. The supply of time, though gloriously regular, is cruelly restricted.

Which of us lives on twenty-four hours a day? And when I say “lives,” I do not mean exists, nor “muddles through.” Which of us is free from that uneasy feeling that the “great spending departments” of his daily life are not managed as they ought to be? Which of us is quite sure that his fine suit is not surmounted by a shameful hat, or that in attending to the crockery he has forgotten the quality of the food? Which of us is not saying to himself—which of us has not been saying to himself all his life: “I shall alter that when I have a little more time”?

We never shall have any more time. We have, and we have always had, all the time there is. It is the realisation of this profound and neglected truth (which, by the way, I have not discovered) that has led me to the minute practical examination of daily time-expenditure.”

This one chapter sums up the miracle of life that we all, who are able to read this, possess.

This is the first chapter of a book titled: How to Live on 24 hours a day; Author: Arnold Bennet.

Born: May 27, 1867, Hanley, Staffordshire, United Kingdom
Died: March 27, 1931, London, United Kingdom